Posted by: jockmackenzie | March 18, 2010

“Poetry & Song” – Entry 12 – The Limerick #4

thanks to picpoke.com for the photo

More from my unpublished book “Poetry & Song”

The idea, in this section especially, is to promote rhythm. It’s fairly easy, for most, to see the difference between:

There once was a man from Kerflope

Who liked to walk on a tightrope

And

There once was a man from Kerflope

Who moved like a swift antelope

Normally, we would emphasize the second syllable of Kerflope but the first syllable of tightrope. The two don’t go together well. In the second example, the rhythm of from Kerflope and antelope is a good match. If the student has to force the rhythm, then more work is required.

Ah, there’s the rub – the word work rears its ugly head. I would rather that the poem be a little suspect in its rhythm and still get completed than have the student throw up his hands in despair, opting for something funner. I do mention that “The only place were ‘success’ comes before ‘work’ is in the dictionary.” but a balance must be achieved. For me, it’s a matter of small steps Get the student to write some decent poetry and then worry about refining.

Moving along. My next step is to offer a number of possible first lines and ask students to supply a suitable second line – suitable meaning having about the same number of syllables, a rhyming word at the end, and a decent rhythm.

I knew a big puppet named Jack

________________________________________________________

I once met a frog named Georgine

________________________________________________________

She said to me, “My, what a nose!”

________________________________________________________

There once was a monstrous great cat

________________________________________________________

I knew an old lady who said,

________________________________________________________

I once knew a dwarf who could sing

________________________________________________________

There once was a little bear cub

________________________________________________________

I met an old farmer named John

______________________________________________________

The dog down the block

____________________________________________________

The horse and the cow

____________________________________________________

My boyfriend’s afraid

____________________________________________________

We searched high and low

____________________________________________________

The night was so black

____________________________________________________

At noon the next day

____________________________________________________

He growled right out loud

____________________________________________________

I love apple pie

____________________________________________________


Responses

  1. Hello! My name is Emily. I’ve created a program called “Sing Books with Emily”…I sing songs that have been made into illustrated picture books to kids at local bookstores, schools, and events. LOTS of fun. Many of the songs are “Singable Poems” that have been illustrated into books all their own (like “The Owl and the Pussycat,” by Edward Lear, or “Fairy Went A-Marketing,” by Rose Fyleman). And, it’s fun to find poems that fit nicely with established tunes (like “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” by Robert Frost, fits perfectly with “Greensleeves.” Many other poems that have be set to music can be found in illustrated anthologies of poetry.

    Posts about all these songs and the the illustrated books what go with them are on my blog:
    http://www.SingBooksWithEmily.wordpress.com.

    It’s fun to find your blog about putting music and poetry together. I’ll enjoy checking it out. Do you mind if I create a link to your blog?

    Here are my links:
    http://www.SingBooksWithEmily.Wordpress.com
    http://www.MySpace.com/SingBooksWithEmily
    http://www.YouTube.com/emleatha
    (my space has a couple of tracks for Singable Picture Books, including a performance of “The Owl and the Pussycat” from my cabaret show “It’s a Junlge Out There” and many “Sing Books with Emily” gatherings.


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